France

Say Goodbye to Paris Plages 2014

  It’s the last weekend of Paris Plages, one of the many efforts of the city government to make life a little easier for its citizens (and attract even more tourists) by bringing the beach (the plage) to the city. Jan and I went to the Seine-side plage the other day and heard hardly any …

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Dixieland Jazz on Boulevard Saint-Germain

There’s no more lively place on a Saturday afternoon than Boulevard Saint-Germain around the old church of Saint-Germain-des-Prés in the 6th arrondissement. It used to be one of the creative centers of the city but now is noted for the fashion industry and tourism. The two famous cafés, Les Deux Magots and Café de Flore, …

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How do you move out of an apartment in Paris?

THE STAIRWELLS and elevators of Paris apartment buildings are notoriously cramped, so the city’s movers have developed their own conveyor system to get furniture out through a window. This one, just off the busy Rue Froidevaux in the Montparnasse district, is just across the street from Montparnasse Cemetery, final resting place for many artists and …

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Jim Goldsborough author interview: “The Paris Herald”

“The best years of our lives” In the 60s, Jim Goldsborough was the star Paris reporter for the Paris Herald-Tribune (later to be the International Herald Tribune and the International New York Times). He recently published The Paris Herald, a roman à clef mined from his exciting days at the Herald. It was a yeasty time …

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[Review] The Paris Herald – a novel that’s catnip for journalism or Paris junkies. Highly recommended.

For me, The Paris Herald (*****) was like a thrilling ride in a time machine. It covers in detail the desperate time in the late 60s when the New York Herald Tribune failed, threatening its Paris satellite with extinction or (even worse in the eyes of the ink-stained wretches who worked there), a takeover by …

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[Review] The Resistance: A morality tale wrapped in a fine thriller

I CAN’T IMMEDIATELY THINK of a better premise for a novel than the one Peter Steiner found: “I invented two young men and put them in dire circumstances.” He made them members of the French Resistance. “Dire” hardly covers it. Think about it: One of the brothers, Onesime Josquin, is a rifleman standing fruitless duty on …

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Interview with Peter Steiner, author of THE RESISTANCE

Part-Time Parisian welcomes PETER STEINER to its series of author interviews and reviews. He’s a super-creative man — for one, he’s the force behind the New Yorker cartoon absolutely everybody has heard of, the one captioned, “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog.” (See his bio on his Amazon author page.) Today we’re discussing …

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D-Day: The Atlantic Wall and Pointe du Hoc

I’VE WRITTEN several posts about D-Day and the Atlantic Wall, but want to call your attention to this piece from the New York Review of Books. It’s the best explanation of the Pointe du Hoc debacle (an heroic debacle, but a debacle nevertheless) that I’ve seen, and its discussion of the Atlantic Wall and its …

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D-Day on the home front

THE NORMANDY INVASION on D-Day brought Americans to the streets in massive numbers. Some went to rallies, some to church, some just went out to be around their fellow citizens. The web site of the Smithsonian Institution has as remarkable series of pictures made that day. Take a look – it will be time well spent. …

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D-Day: the 70th anniversary

Friday is the 70th anniversary of D-Day, the massive Allied invasion of France whose success made clear World War II was entering its final phases. The war in Europe had been under way almost five years and would slog on another eleven months, until the German government surrendered in May 1945. Normandy was at the …

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